Wednesday, November 4, 2015

How To beat Empty Nest Syndrome: Michael Peggs of Marccx Media


***The following is a sponsored post by Michael Peggs, founder of Marccx Media. His company is a digital marketing agency that specializes in SEO and Content Marketing.



HOW TO BEAT EMPTY NEST SYNDROME


What is Empty Nest Syndrome?

"Empty Nest Syndrome refers to feelings of sadness or depression experienced by parents after our children have left our homes and moved on to their own ones. This may be when our children go to college or get married and", according to Psychology Today, "women are more likely to be affected than men, as often, when the nest is emptying, mothers are going through other important events in their lives, such as menopause."

What are the Signs of Empty Nest Syndrome?
The prevailing sign of empty nest syndrome is a feeling of sadness. Spending time in your absent child's bedroom to feel closer to him or her is also common. While it’s normal to miss our children when they’re not around, if you do find yourself experiencing empty nest syndrome, you should monitor your reactions and their duration. If start feeling as if your life has no meaning or your life has ended, you should consider seeking professional help.


1. Learn to enjoy your new freedom – As your kids go off to college to learn and grow and shape their lives, it can be scary for them and for you as well, but this new found freedom can be a positive thing; giving you a chance to grow as well. Maybe think about taking up those things that you had to put on hold when you were raising children and dedicate some time to yourself.
2. Join a gym – Sitting around at home moping over the loss of your old life is one of the worst things you can do and will only result in more melancholy feelings. It’s time to get outside and join a gym, or learn that new dance step you’ve been hearing about, take up tennis, or a sport you’ve been wanting to try. Not only will you be looking out for your fitness, but you will also be releasing endorphins, the happy hormone, which will help blast away the blues.
3. Take up a new skill – Now is the time to think about you and the things you are interested in without having to worry about parent/teacher meetings and afterschool excursions. Are you keen to learn a language? Take up evening classes. Always wanted to try your hand at pottery? Now’s the time. Not only will you be working on yourself, but you’ll also meet new people and maybe even make new friends in the process.
4. Don’t let distance be a barrier – There are now so many ways to use technology to bring your family together. Make sure that you schedule time every day or week to speak with your kids, and you could try building blogs, a Family website, or photo albums, as an excellent way of bringing you together with your loved ones.

5. Finally, remember nothing is forever – In fact, the chances are that in a couple of years, your kids will be right back under your roof. Studies have shown that a record number of young adults between the ages of 18-31 move back in with their parents after college. More than likely you’ll be wishing your kids would get back out from under your hair in no time.



Michael Peggs

Michael Peggs is the founder of Marccx Media, a digital marketing agency specializing in SEO and Content Marketing. Before Marcxx, Peggs worked at Google in business development, forming digital media and advertising partnerships. He is also a blogger and podcaster, hosting the iTunes Top 10 New & Noteworthy podcast You University – The Personal Branding Podcast.






21 comments:

  1. I will be going through this in 8-10 years... I have already decided to travel to keep myself busy... these are some really great ideas... It is good think about how you will handle it before it actually happens xox

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  2. Almost impossible for me to relate to this -- the empty nest only brought me closer to my kids. So it was a win-win

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    1. I know I'm happier now that the older ones have moved out and started independent lives of their own.

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  3. My mom totally went through this when I left for law school!!

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    1. Hopefully you don't live too far away from her now? I hope you get to see her often.

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  4. I've definitely found that keeping busy trying new things is very helpful! Every now and then I'll see something that makes me miss my daughter like crazy but, in general, it's been wonderful to have some time for myself. Regular time to talk helps a lot too, of course.

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    1. When our kids first left, we started Skyping with them and that really helped.

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  5. I was sad when my two-youngest kids left at the same time. I thought I would have the youngest for another year-or -two but I adjusted well to my empty nest. You definitely have to plan for it, have things to do.
    Just as I really got used to it I was blessed with a granddaughter and twelve more grands followed her.

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    1. Wow! That's a big family! Doesn't sound like there's any time to get lonely!

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  6. Or have children who are like boomerangs and keep coming back

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  7. When my daughter went to college across the nation, I did miss her but the anticipation was worse than the reality. Now that she is living abroad, I do find myself blue and in more of a transition as I know she won't be living "home" again whereas she still came home during college breaks.

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    1. Oh, that would be tough. She's very far away. I hope you get to see her soon!

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  8. I planned a lot of extra travel this fall to distract myself. And, I decided to sponsor and run a regional conference for Professional Organizers THIS SATURDAY which is keeping me busy. Still a bit sad, but busy helps:)

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    1. Congrats on sponsoring the conference--I imagine you are VERY busy now!!

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  9. Boy is this is useful, what great original ideas.

    I would like to summarize "Stop feeling sorry for yourself and get off your ass."

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  10. Our son is 35 and my wife is still experiencing empty nest syndrome. I've moved on.

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    1. Think I would too if my son was 35, ha-ha!

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  11. This is such an great discussion would've love to be there. Thanks for sharing. www.jemereviews.com

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